Cybersecurity has been a key priority for the SEC and its Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations (OCIE) in recent years. The OCIE regularly releases publications addressing cybersecurity risks and practices, including eight risk alerts related to cybersecurity since 2012.

In the latest example, OCIE recently published its Cybersecurity and Resiliency Observations Report, describing 34

The SEC’s new Risk Alert provides valuable insight as to what the OCIE wants to see broker dealers and investment advisers accomplish with their privacy notices and their cybersecurity policies and procedures. The SEC wants this written documentation to be comprehensive, to accurately reflect the registrant’s practices, and to be implemented effectively throughout their business.

In December 2018, the Securities and Exchange Commission’s Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations (OCIE) published its fifth and last risk alert of 2018 on the topic of electronic messaging by personnel of registered investment advisers. In the alert, OCIE focuses its attention on the growing use by advisory personnel of various types of electronic

An SEC cybersecurity sweep examination by the SEC’s Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations (OCIE) found that 88 percent of the broker-dealers (BDs) and 74 percent of the registered investment advisers (RIAs) they visited experienced cyber-attacks directly or indirectly through vendors, the SEC reported in a February 3, 2015 Risk Alert.

The sweep found that

The SEC is not wasting any time making sure that newly registered municipal advisors are introduced to their regulator.  On August 19, 2014, the SEC announced a two-year examination initiative for municipal advisors that registered with the SEC in accordance with final municipal advisor rules that became effective on July 1, 2014.  OCIE’s National Examination

Andrew Bowden, Director of the SEC’s Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations (OCIE), recently “spread sunshine” on private equity industry practices gathered through so-called “presence exams” of newly registered private fund advisers.

The goal, he said, is to help these advisers spot potential issues before they find themselves in regulatory hot water.  But the “sunshine”