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On June 8, 2017, the U.S. House of Representatives, by a vote mostly along party lines, approved a bill that would repeal many of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (“Dodd-Frank”) requirements and significantly reduce the regulatory burden for financial institutions. If enacted in its current form, the Financial CHOICE Act of

A March 13, 2017 presidential order requiring a comprehensive plan to reorganize the executive branch could be the first step toward streamlining the financial regulatory structure.

The Executive Order requires the Director of the Office of Management and Budget to propose a plan within a year to reorganize government functions and eliminate unnecessary agencies, agency

Robo-advisers, those automated bots that offer up personalized investment advice with little, if any, human contact, face increased regulatory scrutiny as they grow more popular. After monitoring and engaging them for several months, the SEC’s Division of Investment Management lent a personal touch in guidance published in February 2017, urging robo-advisers to improve risk disclosures

Far from the White House and the halls of Congress, compliance officers are preparing their compliance plans for 2017. On everyone’s mind: What will the Trump administration’s commitment to deregulate mean for compliance priorities? The short answer is “not much,” at least for the near-future. To predict what’s in store for the immediate future, compliance

In this fast-changing regulatory environment, the long-term consequences – both intended and unintended – of the recent White House remain uncertain, but looking into our crystal ball, we certain trends emerging.  These trends may lead to long-term shifts in how the Securities and Exchange Commission approaches regulation and enforcement, but, at least in the short-term,

The staff of the SEC’s Division of Investment Management effectively allowed brokers to determine the commissions they will charge their customers who buy “Clean Shares” of mutual funds.

In a “no-action” letter dated January 11, 2017, the staff said that it concurs with the view that the restrictions of Section 22(d) of the Investment

The SEC’s National Examination Program (NEA) of the Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations (OCIE) announced that its examination priorities in 2017 will focus on three general areas: retail investors, risks specific to elderly investors and retirement investing, and assessing market-wide risks.

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